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Does The Administrator of An Estate Get Paid In Northern California?

If you’re a probate administrator appointed by the court and want to know, does the administrator of an estate get paid in Northern California? This is the right blog that answers all your relevant questions regarding this topic. 

A probate administrator is a person whom the court appoints after the death of someone. It’s only in the case that someone dies without nominating a person, whether it’s from family or friends as an executive. 

One of the biggest misconceptions people have is that the administrator of the estate doesn’t get paid, which isn’t true. Today, we’ll explain how much the administrator of an estate gets paid as per Northern California law and for which duties. 

Administrator Fee As Per California State Law

When the court appoints an administrator for the estate matter, the fee will be paid according to the law. As per California probate code section 10800 administrators get paid as per the total value of the estate. Here’s the overview of the percentage: 

  • 4% on the first $100,000.
  • 3% on the next $100,000.
  • 2% on the next $800,000.
  • 1% on the next $9,000,000.
  • 0.5% on the next $15,000,000. 
  • For amounts over $25,000,000, the court determines a reasonable fee.

Suppose the total value of the estate is $500,000. According to the California Probate Code Section 10800, the administrator fee would be calculated as follows: 

  • 4% on the first $100,000: $100,000 x 4% = $4,000
  • 3% on the next $100,000: $100,000 x 3% = $3,000
  • 2% on the next $300,000: $300,000 x 2% = $6,000

Adding these amounts together, the total administrator fee for an estate valued at $500,000 would be $13,000.

How To Become An Estate Administrator In Northern California?

An executor is nominated by the deceased person in a will. While an administrator is appointed by the court in case no one is nominated for the executor role. The person who wants to become an administrator has to file an application in the probate court. 

Once the application has been received, the court hearings will begin. In the court proceedings, the judge evaluates the administrator’s application to determine whether the person can fulfill the duties and responsibilities of administering the estate.

The judge considers factors such as the applicant’s relationship to the deceased, financial responsibility, and ability to manage the estate impartially. If the court approves the application, the appointed individual receives the legal authority of the administrator. 

What Are The Duties of An Estate Administrator In Northern California?

Now, let’s come to the duties of an estate adminisxtrator in Northern California. The duties are almost similar to the executioner because the purpose is the same. Below, you’ll find details about the primary duties of a probate administrator. 

1. Notify Beneficiaries

The first and main role of a probate administrator is to notify all beneficiaries or every heir of the deceased person. It’s important to note this task should be completed within 60 days of filing a probate case in the court. 

2. Property Valuation

The second primary role is to identify and evaluate the assets to find out the property’s real value so it can be distributed fairly. You can get help from experts who know the market value of the deceased person’s property. 

3. Fulfilling Probate Responsibilities

The third duty of an estate administrator is fulfilling probate responsibilities. It includes following court hearings, filing necessary documents, and communicating with heirs to make sure every beneficiary receives their fair share of the property. 

4. Settling Credit, Debt, and Taxes

The next-in-line duty is finding out details about the creditors and debtors and settling the issue using estate funds. You also have to settle tax dues for the deceased person as per the law of California’s state. 

Administrator Fee In Northern California For The Year 2024: Final Thoughts 

Yes, the administrator of an estate gets paid in Northern California as per the law. The administrators handling larger estates will receive substantial compensation compared to those overseeing smaller ones. 

In return for this compensation, the administrator fulfills various duties. These duties include managing the entire probate process and ensuring every heir receives the rightful share in the property as per the deceased person’s wishes or by law (in the absence of a will). 

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Dustin MacFarlane’s primary focus is on Elder Law and protecting families and seniors. He is a Certified Specialist in Estate Planning, Trust, and Probate Law by the State Bar of California Board of Specialization — a rare distinction.

Prior to becoming an attorney, Mr. MacFarlane worked in the Long Term Care industry. After becoming licensed to practice law in January of 2009, Elder Law quickly became his focus. Seeing the need during his former career, Mr. MacFarlane pursued Elder Law as a primary area of practice.

By Dustin MacFarlane

Dustin MacFarlane’s primary focus is on Elder Law and protecting families and seniors. He is a Certified Specialist in Estate Planning, Trust, and Probate Law by the State Bar of California Board of Specialization — a rare distinction.

Prior to becoming an attorney, Mr. MacFarlane worked in the Long Term Care industry. After becoming licensed to practice law in January of 2009, Elder Law quickly became his focus. Seeing the need during his former career, Mr. MacFarlane pursued Elder Law as a primary area of practice.